Rallying Employees for External Campaigns with Caroline Dunnet

Summary

This week we decided to spice things up a bit and kick-off IABC Virtual World Conference with two pre-conference, special edition Bananatag Morning Shows.

Adam was busy charming IABC World Conference go-ers as one of the MCs, so we invited our good friend Pinaki Kathiari to help co-host. 

In this episode, we had the wonderful Caroline Dunnet from Edelman on the show, chatting about her Gold Quill Award-Winning Case Study for Dove+Men Care Global Paternity Leave Campaign. She gave us a sneak peek at her session for World Conference and talked to us about how they adapted the campaign to resonate across national, political, and cultural borders while rallying employees to become internal advocates. 

Resources

#TakeTheTime | 5 Dads. 5 Weeks. | Dove Men+Care
Free Back-to-Work SharePoint template

Transcript

Kyla:

(silence) Good morning and welcome. I’m Kyla Sims.

Pinaki:

And I’m Pinaki Kathiari and you’re watching a very, very special IABC World Conference episode of the Bananatag Morning Show.

Kyla:

But depending on where you’re tuning in from, this might be your lunch or your happy hour. Regardless, you will usually find us here every Wednesday and Friday at 9 AM Pacific and 12 PM Eastern, getting in integral communicators from around the world to share practical advice and tips about communicating during COVID 19. And having some last minute chat as well.

Kyla:

But today, we’re doing things a little differently. As you can see, in honor of the IABC World Conference happening this week, we’ve decided to spice things up a little bit. We’re going to jump on a little bit early before everyone gets into the conference so we can chat a little bit. We’re going to talk about what everybody’s learning at the conference. We’re going to interview some awesome speakers from the conference about their sessions. So you get a sneak peek behind the scenes.

Kyla:

And of course, I’m joined by a new co-host this morning. Adam is busy emceeing the World Conference, so I asked my good friend Pinaki, CEO of Local Wisdom, and former morning show guest, actually our first morning show guest to help me out today. So thanks for helping me out Pinaki.

Pinaki:

Thank you so much, Kyla. And thank you all. Sorry.

Kyla:

No, go ahead.

Pinaki:

I’m sorry. I was just going to say, I just thank you. I’ve said it before. I’ll keep saying again. I love what you guys are doing and it’s a pleasure to work with you all. I know I’m no substitute for Adam, but we’re going to have a good time and I’m really excited about our guest and the topic today because it really hits home. Yeah, so thank you.

Kyla:

That’s great. Okay, so we have Caroline here. You can see her. Hello, Caroline, how you doing?

Caroline:

Hi, good. How are you guys?

Kyla:

Doing good. Well, it’s been a while since you’ve been on the show, Pinaki. We started March 23rd and a lot has changed since then. A number of things and well obviously the obvious things like the world. But also lots of things have changed in your life as well.

Pinaki:

That is right.

Kyla:

Something very special has happened recently.

Pinaki:

That is specifically last week. It was on June 3rd, we introduced a new family member to our household so I am a proud parent of a new baby daughter named Annika.

Kyla:

Exciting.

Pinaki:

Exactly, so I am officially on paternity leave, but this is a fun time right now and it’s a pleasure to join you all and, like I said, on this topic.

Kyla:

Yeah, and so we didn’t plan it this way, but actually what Caroline’s going to talk today about is about a campaign she did with Dove Unilever about the Dove Plus Men Care Campaign around paternity leave. So we didn’t actually plan it this way but it’s actually, it’s perfect to have you on.

Caroline:

Perfect timing.

Kyla:

Yeah, it’s absolutely perfect.

Pinaki:

Exactly. Amazing how things just come together like that, right?

Kyla:

Yeah, well I’m really grateful to have you both here. I’m really excited. If you’re live in the chat right now, make sure you say hi. Tell us where you’re tuning in from. And if you’re attending IABC World Conference today, let us know what session you’re most looking forward to. So Pinaki, why don’t you introduce Caroline for us.

Pinaki:

Right on. Yeah, I think Adam will be a bit jealous because he’s not co-hosting today because we have a really wonderful session here. And the talented Caroline Dunnet will be joining us from Edelman. And Caroline is a Senior Account Director at Edelman’s Brand Practice, where she’s a Client Strategist and an Account Lead. So she develops integrated campaigns and programs, basically leading CPG brands. And just some of the many brands that she’s worked with over the years includes Best Buy, Walmart, Johnson & Johnson, Nestle, and Unilever.

Pinaki:

And specifically, Unilever is who we’re going to be talking about today because Caroline is speaking at the IABC Virtual World Conference tomorrow. And she’s going to be talking about her Gold Quill award winning case study on the Dove Men Care Take the Paternity Leave Campaign. So today she’s joining us from her hometown in Toronto, Canada. So Caroline, thank you so much for joining us today. We’re really happy to have you here.

Caroline:

Yeah, thank you guys. I’m excited.

Pinaki:

Right. So it’s great to have you here and today we’re going to be talking about creating campaigns. And not only one that resonates with the global audience but also rallying internal audiences that bring together that internal and external. Before we get into all that, let’s just get to know Caroline just a little bit better.

Kyla:

Yes, yes, yes, yes. Okay. So everyone’s going to have to bear with me just a little bit because I’m doing all the technical on the back end. But we’re going to do our favorite segment that we like to call Getting To Know You. So how it works is we get to ask you as many questions as we can in 30 seconds and you have to respond on the spot as quickly as you can. Does that sound good, Caroline?

Caroline:

Sounds perfect, I’m ready.

Kyla:

Okay. All right, okay. We’re going to pretend that there’s 30 seconds on the clock, but we always go over. It never actually works that way. All right. So where were you born?

Caroline:

I was actually born in Nova Scotia, so I’m a Maritimer at heart.

Kyla:

Nice, nice.

Pinaki:

What was your favorite sport?

Caroline:

Basketball. I actually grew up playing basketball so I’m a huge Raptors fan as well. Hoping they come back.

Kyla:

What was your first job?

Caroline:

I worked at a golf course as a golf cart, drink server.

Pinaki:

Nice. Now if you could work from anywhere during this quarantine, where would you work?

Caroline:

I had to think long and hard about this one, but I think it would be Siargao, which is an island in the Philippines.

Kyla:

Oh interesting.

Caroline:

If you haven’t been, it’s beautiful. I highly recommend.

Kyla:

And who would play you in the movie of your life?

Caroline:

Also, very tough question. I had to poll a few friends for this one. So I think some of them said I look like Olivia Wilde which I don’t see at all.

Kyla:

Oh I totally see it.

Caroline:

But I honestly think I could play myself. I could have a second career in acting.

Kyla:

I love it.

Pinaki:

Oh, that’s interesting. I think we should dip into that a little bit later but speaking of acting and then so what was the last TV show that you binged?

Caroline:

Defending Jacob. So it’s a series on Crave, I think. Or Apple TV.

Kyla:

Oh nice. Well, thank you for being such a good sport. Excellent answers. And now that we’re well acquainted, why don’t we just get down to it. All right?

Caroline:

Let’s do it.

Kyla:

All right.

Pinaki:

Okay, so you’ll be presenting at the IABC World Conference tomorrow on a campaign you did with Unilever. And by the way, congratulations that you won a Gold Quill Award so first of all, let me say that.

Kyla:

Good job.

Caroline:

Thank you.

Pinaki:

Right, exactly. Yay for that. So you’ll be speaking tomorrow at 11 AM PST, right? So are you excited, first of all? And have you presented at the World Conference before?

Caroline:

So I haven’t presented at the conference before so a bit nervous but I’m really excited and I think this campaign was incredibly rewarding to work on so I’m very excited to be presenting tomorrow.

Pinaki:

Awesome. I think that makes sense and we were talking earlier, I think when you are really passionate about it and you just put your heart into it, presenting is going to be a piece of cake.

Caroline:

I’m sure.

Pinaki:

So we know you’re going to rock it.

Caroline:

Thanks.

Kyla:

And can you … Go ahead. No, go ahead. Sorry, I keep cutting you off.

Pinaki:

Really, right? No, I’m just kidding. No, so just to talk a little bit about the campaign, can you just tell me a little bit about the campaign and what your session is going to be about?

Caroline:

For sure. So just to provide a bit of background so at Edelman, we work on a variety of Unilever brands within beauty and personal care, food, and home care. And Dove Men Plus Care was one of those brands. So as you mentioned, I’ll be presenting tomorrow for our paternity leave campaign that we developed in partnership with our agency partners Ogilvy and Mindshare and it’s a very exciting campaign. I think it’s rooted in brand purpose which we’ll get to in a minute. But yeah, so that’s what I’ll be talking about.

Kyla:

Fantastic. We have a short video from the campaign. I feel like we should watch it. What do you think?

Caroline:

Let’s do it.

Pinaki:

Let’s hear it. Roll that.

Kyla:

Awesome. Okay, so you’re going to have to give me two seconds to just figure out my life here. Make sure [inaudible 00:09:23]. All right. Let’s make this widescreen. All right.

Video Speaker 1:

“It’s worth it. Changes your perspective of everything.”

Video Speaker 2:

“Besides the financial stress, I don’t see any drawbacks to it.”

Video Speaker 3:

“You know, you just roll with the punches and see how it goes every day.”

Video Speaker 4:

“People might say that it’s wifely duties, but it’s not. It’s family duties.”

Video Speaker 5:

“It helps you build a bond with your child that a lot dads have been missing out on.”

Video Speaker 6:

“When I saw her smile, my heart grows bigger and bigger.”

Video Speaker 7:

“Even the couple weeks I just had, I’m never going to get that back again and I wouldn’t trade it up for any money in the world.”

Video Speaker 8:

“It just adds up to what I actually want to do as a father.”

Kyla:

So good. So good.

Caroline:

Very good. Yeah, so Ogilvy were the masters behind that beautiful creative.

Kyla:

Oh it’s so good. So I’m really curious, why a paternity leave campaign? What’s the motivation there?

Caroline:

For sure. So I mean as many of know brand purpose is incredibly important now more than ever. And Dove, the female brand within the Dove portfolio, that was a brand that was born on purpose. Everyone is familiar with real beauty and what Dove stands for in supporting inclusivity and diversity. And so when Dove Men came to fruition in 2010, they wanted to start from the very beginning by establishing what they stood for as a brand and what their purpose meant. And that paternity leave. So they wanted to support breaking down stereotypes and debunking what it means to be a man in today’s society and support men in taking the time to spend with their families on pat leave.

Kyla:

Very cool.

Pinaki:

Thank you so much for doing that. Seriously, I mean just even-

Caroline:

For you right now, it’s even more exciting.

Pinaki:

I know. I mean that video was touching. And you’re right. Like going on paternity has a whole bunch of other emotional things that come out for men as well. That was really touching. It was almost like tear jerking. And like last night, I was up with the baby crying, burping and everything like that so I totally feel it. Even like some of the stigmas that you said or the myths type of thing. Even like my wife told me, just yesterday, she was like, “After a baby is born, they promote that skin to skin with the mom.” And we’ve been talking about that throughout the whole pregnancy. And then she was like, yesterday she was like, “You know what? That’s preferred for fathers too.” So it was like, let’s go skin to skin and enjoy that time with your child. And yet, we don’t stop and think about that. But it’s something that’s truly a bonding experience so thank you for doing that.

Caroline:

Absolutely. And I mean I think establishing that relationship early on, there’s tons of data and even research that we did that proves if you spend that time early on, you’re only going to have a stronger relationship. Your child is going to call out for dad just as much as they call out for mom in some instances and so it’s really important to promote active fatherhood and having dads involved in their kids’ lives early on.

Pinaki:

Absolutely, absolutely. And there’s a huge impact from society. This is the birth. This is the beginning of it. And so, the future depends on it, right?

Caroline:

For sure.

Pinaki:

So what was interesting is that we work with a lot of global brands and global companies so Unilever is not different, right? Paternity leave, though, is different in different places throughout the world. So how did you manage adapting something across the different areas and the different policies and the different legal systems? And so make sure it resonates?

Caroline:

For sure and I think for me personally, I work on a variety of a Unilever brands at Edelman and it is a global company. And Edelman is also global so there’s the benefit of working on global brands because you’re able to connect with global marketers and discuss different campaigns. But then the real challenge is bringing that campaign to your market in a locally relevant way. So for paternity leave, yes the Canadian policy is very different than say the US. This campaign similarly ran in the US, but with very different nuances. So I would say there’s three key takeaways when taking a global message or program and adapting it for a local audience.

Caroline:

The first would be changing and adapting your creative and copy. So for example, in the ads that we just saw, there was multiple versions of those and there was shorter cut downs on Instagram and Facebook and the copy on those had to be very relevant for Canada. It couldn’t talk about fighting to get a policy made. The policy’s here. We need to fight for men to actually take the time that they have.

Caroline:

The second would be our call to action so similar to … Our tagline in Canada was “Take the time.” Because men have five weeks access to take that time with their newborn. In the US, their message was “Take the pledge.” So they have a pledge for people to sign and then funds that they had would then be given to men if they were able to take that time off with their children but the messaging was very different. And that call to action for consumers was very different. We were encouraging men to take the time they have access to.

Caroline:

And then, I would say the third one would be how do we leverage influential voices to help bring our campaign to life? So that would be through a spokesperson who we partnered with, influential dads who would share their own stories on social, and then also internal communicators which I know we’ll get to ensuring that your internal employees are also advocating for that campaign.

Kyla:

And we’re seeing brands around the world right now being called out for saying one thing in the media and then doing something a little bit different internally. I mean that’s generous, but for such an emotional campaign, there’s a high risk of having a little bit of like “Oh yeah” emotional kickback from employees if the external doesn’t match the internal. So what did you do to make sure that the external messaging matched with what the organization was doing internally?

Caroline:

Great question. And I think oftentimes, that can sometimes be forgotten. Sometimes you’re thinking first, especially at an agency, we’re always thinking how do we reach the consumer? What is our consumer message? But it really is important to think internally first and do we have the credibility to walk the walk?

Caroline:

And so something that we did is we worked really closely with Unilever HR and their corporate comms teams to figure out what are their policies? And how are they communicating pat leave benefits internally to their employees? And figuring out even the percentage of men who have taken paternity leave and what their experiences are?

Caroline:

And so, before we even launched the campaign, we had those conversations to figure out what was happening internally and then, before we went live, we actually had a town hall at Unilever and communicated what the program was in order to help build that credibility from the ground up and make sure that their employees were also on board.

Pinaki:

That’s awesome.

Kyla:

Very cool.

Pinaki:

That is very awesome. We have to applaud you and Unilever for doing that. I mean in answering the last two questions, you’ve basically reached out to all of your audiences in a very specific, compassionate way, internal and external, all right? Which is pretty awesome. How did that work out? Like how did rallying specifically the internal audiences really help make this campaign successful? Were there any interesting stories or any tidbits from the internal success?

Caroline:

I think starting at the town hall a few things that we did was (a) chatting about what the campaign was and what it stood for. But also giving internal employees, whether they are taking pat leave or not, a toolkit so that they know (a) what are the internal policies? Who do they need to speak to if they have more questions? And (b) if they want more information or if they want to share information with their own networks, where does that information live? And so making sure there is some sort of campaign hub or landing page where people can get all of the information they need too about the particular topic of pat leave.

Kyla:

And that’s like probably been more relevant in terms of internal communicators having to rally all of the employees for an external initiative. We’re seeing that during COVID and, of course, with the Black Lives Matter movement in such a huge way. I’m curious, what advice do you have for internal communicators who are being asked to support external initiatives by rallying employees? Like what did you find the most helpful?

Caroline:

I think I always say like context is kind so providing as much context as you possibly can and the why. So like why are we, as a brand and as an organization, standing for paternity leave? And why are we going out with this message so strongly because it helps people understand the background and the nuances and it’s easier for them to get on board with something that they fully understand. So I always, I think context is incredibly important to make sure that people truly understand the whole reason behind a certain message.

Kyla:

That’s great advice. So we’re actually down … Time flies. We’re actually down to our last 10 minutes with you, Caroline. And you know what that means? I mean maybe you do, maybe you don’t. It’s the Bananatag Tool Tip of the Day, but today it’s just a tip. So Caroline, what is your tip of the day?

Caroline:

My tip of the day is ask questions. And I mean it sounds like a very simple tip, but as I previously mentioned, the why is so important. And so whether you’re an agency or Internal Comms, asking why and uncovering … And don’t just stop at asking the first why. Ask two or three why’s because sometimes and oftentimes, that will uncover a new opportunity or put you down a whole different path than where you originally were going with a certain idea. And I think that starts from the very beginning of a new brief or a new campaign idea, or in the middle of a program if you’re thinking about what’s working and what’s not, you need to continuously ask yourself why.

Pinaki:

Awesome.

Kyla:

That’s great. That’s a fantastic tip. Fantastic. It’s never a bad idea to be asking why. And we actually have a special bonus awesome tool from Pinaki today which it’s a little bit … It’s not completely in tune with what we’ve been talking about, but I know that our audience is going to go absolutely buck for this. They’re going to be so excited. I know this because I work in content. But Pinaki, why don’t you tell us about your tool tip, what you’re sharing today?

Pinaki:

Yeah. So several weeks ago, we’ve all been … Like I said, it’s been months we’ve been dealing with this COVID 19 and working remotely. So I challenged my team to come up with some ways where we can help solve challenges that internal communicators will be facing in the upcoming months. And we had a bunch of ideas. One that really came out and we started working on was how the world is opening up and people are coming back in.

Pinaki:

So internal communicators, we’re all going to be challenged with letting employees know how they’re going to return into the workplace, right? And Caroline said a little earlier today, they created a hub on where they could give the information for this campaign. So we did something very similar. We created a template, Microsoft SharePoint intranet hub and it comes with architecture, design and content. And it allows you to customize it for however it’s going to work out for your organization whether you’re coming back to the workplace or not or going to hold out for a little bit longer, right?

Pinaki:

This is just one tool that we’ve come up and it comes with a checklist for things that you need to consider when coming back to the office, a content manuscript, all the graphics you need, and a tutorial on how to set up this SharePoint modern intranet. And ultimately, it’s there to set up a communications hub to communicate everything that your employees need to know about coming back to the office and what it’s going to be like. So we’re really hopeful that this could help. It’s for free and I believe Kyla will be sharing the link to everyone.

Kyla:

Yeah, absolutely. And I know it will be a hot commodity because that’s where everybody’s at right now is that reopening point. And yeah. It’s a big deal because again, like this is very unprecedented. Nobody has a playbook for like oh what do you do when you’ve had a global pandemic and everybody needs to come back to the office. So that’s so wonderful. Thank you to you and the team at Local Wisdom for putting that together. I know people are going to be so stoked on that. And yeah, thanks everybody. We’re going to put the link in the chat for that.

Kyla:

And of course, yeah. I think we’re getting near the end here. If you’re … yeah, of course. Oh Caroline, your session is 11:00 tomorrow, am I correct?

Caroline:

Yes.

Kyla:

Excellent so make sure that you do not miss that.

Caroline:

Tune in. I only grazed the surface. There’s lots more to talk about.

Pinaki:

She gets much deeper tomorrow.

Kyla:

Yes. And of course, Pinaki, you did a great job today but tomorrow I’m getting another friend of mine to join me, Jason Anton of Audacity: Bold Thinking At Work. He’s going to join me as co-host which I’m sure will not be as fun as today. I’m sure it won’t be. But he can try. He can give it a shot. He can try to usurp Adam. And Adam’s just going to be … I wanted to trash talk Adam just a little bit more, get him all riled up. But I’m sure he’ll be very jealous.

Kyla:

Of course, we have the lovely Priya Bates on the show tomorrow, talking a little bit about her session and what it’s like attending IABC virtually this year so if you’re curious about what a virtual World Conference looks like, definitely show up tomorrow at 8:00. We’re going to look a little bit deeper into that. And if you enjoyed today’s show, please share it. Tell your friends. Tell your colleagues. Heck, tell your mom. My mom watches, I’m pretty sure, so help us spread the word and visit our page to sign up for the morning show updates and you’ll get special show reminders, exclusive content, and more from our morning show guests.

Pinaki:

And I wanted to take another moment to thank you, Kyla. Thank you Bananatag. And thank you, Caroline. You’re awesome. Great answers. I’m so touched by the work. And also by the information and the wisdom that you shared. One last question, do you have any final words of advice, any parting advice to our guests?

Caroline:

Stay positive. I think now more than ever, it’s bit of an uncertain time. People are dealing with a lot on their plates. And yeah, just try to keep yourself up.

Pinaki:

Excellent.

Kyla:

Great advice. So thanks, Caroline. If you’re attending IABC World Conference, definitely check out her session tomorrow at 11:00 and if you’re around tomorrow morning, you could come hang out with me at 8:00 here at LinkedIn, let’s do it. Thank you again, Pinaki, for being here. What a great show. And thank you everyone in the chat for coming and participating and watching us live. And we’ll see you tomorrow morning, all right?

Caroline:

Thank you both.

Pinaki:

Thank you.

Kyla:

Okay, bye.

Pinaki:

Bye bye.

Caroline:

Bye.

Pinaki:

Bye. I want to say thank you to Kyla’s mom as well, if you’re watching. You did a great job.

Kyla:

Her name is April.